T.Stops Blog

Work Log: 4 Commercials.

Welcome back to Tstops!

About 2 months ago, I had the opportunity to work on five very different commercials, within about a 1 month span. 2x Fashion spots, 1 Toy commercial,  1 spot for Sesame Street and finally a sneaker commercial with a cross marketing twist. I found these five commercials very interesting as they were each so different.   Different styles, directors, locations and circumstances.  It was really fun to shoot with so much variety.

 

Lets start with the first fashion Spot.

1: “Ties That Bind” For Bradford and Young; Luxury accessory maker, directed by Jennifer Massaux.

Shot on Alexa Studio with Zeiss Super Speed MK I lenses.  This is the Alexa with the optical viewfinder and Spinning mirror shutter.  It’s wonderful having an optical viewfinder, feels so much better than a EVF.

This shoot really is a great culmination of many elements.   We shot in the Presidential suite of the Waldorf Astoria Hotel, with Victoria’s Secret model Sarah Stephens.  How could we go wrong?  Beautiful talent, beautiful location, beautiful camera and lenses.  Jennifer, our director, is one of the fastest and best prepared directors I have had the pleasure of working with.   She got access to the location weeks before the shoot, and shot an Iphone previs with Artemis shot by shot, then animated it so it had a sense of pacing.   This meant that I had the advantage of being able to know exactly how long each shot needed to be.  Thus, we could focus on making each of those moments as perfect as possible.  The catch on this shoot was the fact that we only had 6 hours to shoot the whole thing, load in to tail lights.   Having concise shots, and frames already established just let us focus so intensely on exactly what we needed and nothing else.   I used the latitude of the alexa to its fullest using the natural sunlight, and shaping the contrast in the room with black floppies and a 1.8K ARRI M18 with a Chimera as selective fill.

Take this shot for example:

Screen Shot 2014-08-26 at 1.37.19 AM

 

 

The main ambient is sunlight, with a side kick from the M18.  Lighting Diagram from below. I rated the camera at 800, then dropped in an ND .9 and on some shots an ND .3 to keep the lens around a T2.8.  There was also a 1/8th Hollywood Black Magic Filter in play as well as a 1/4 Pearl Filter.  The HBM filter is a combination of 1/8th Classic HD Soft, and 1/8th Black Promist.  It softens the already soft highlights, and helps keep the models skin looking completely flawless.  The pearl filter is similar to the Blackmagic, but includes white diffusion, making it glow a bit.  The Pearl was used in the bedroom,  the HBM was used in the darker scenes.

IMG_2575

 

image (1) image (2) image

I am very happy with how this piece came out.  It goes to show, putting amazing things in front of the camera is far more important than the camera itself.

Tom Wong IATSE lcl600 DIT did the grade in DaVinci.  He is a stellar colorist, and really knocked it out of the park.

image (3)

 

In reality this was a fashion shoot, but it was 90% beauty, the direction I really want to go in.

—————————————————————————————————————————————————

2: “Fall Fashion” for HSN, directed by Little Marvin

This was more or less a classic commercial.   Big studio, big lights, crafty table, canvas chairs and 10 monitors….

Over the course of the last few years, the Home Shopping Network has been trying to freshen up their look while retaining their signature style.   The challenge on this shoot was time management.   We had three models, and 10 looks each, all shot in 60Fps 6K HD.  It worked out to about 15min per look, and we had 30 looks to get in the can. We shot 27 128GIG mags that day.  3 TB of footage.  The only way we’d make it out alive was to have our media work flow down packed.   I purchased a USB3 Redmag reader, and two 4TB G-RAID thunderbolt HDD daisy chained to my macbook.   I had to use my own computer cause i know it worked,  I had ample time to test it.  Each card was offloaded and double backed up in 21 Minutes.  It fit perfectly in the 10 hour day.   It worked out to about 3 cards per hour, and the loader was running cards back the instant they came out of the camera.  The RED mags were hot when they left the camera and still warm when they came back.

The director Little Marvin ( thats his legal name) asked for a contradiction…. He wanted a soft, yet hard light.   I knew exactly what he wanted.  He wanted a Briese light look.  However, there were none in Tampa at the time.  So i did my best to improvise.  I used a single source 10k fresnel, pushed it through a 4×4 frame of 250 Diffusion with a 1ft hole in the middle, and over that hole I had the gaffer tape a scrap of opal diffusion.   Then, that was cut into the vignette you see by taking two 4×8′ black foamcore boards with two semi circles cut into the center, when placed side by side it creates a circle about 6 feet across.   That was placed just out of frame, and the result is a small bit of hard light punching through the opal, mixed with the broad soft light of the 250 around it, then cut into a theatre spot light like circle by the foam core.  see below for a diagram.  You get the clarity and specular highlights in jewelry, while still being kind to the model.   In fact, i find hard lights on truly beautiful faces accentuates the features.  Just look to old hollywood.  Softer lighting is kinder to faces that are not “perfect”, though still looks great on anyone.

IMG_2570 IMG_2571

 

IMG_2572

 

I rated the V2 OLPF RED Epic Dragon at ISO 800 and used a Formatt 1/2 CTB filter in the Mattebox. (read more about why I used the Blue filter here) I also installed a Red Cine X replication of Juan Melara’s KODAK 2393 LUT.  We shot on a Fujinon Cabrio 19-90 and I allowed the image to slightly overexpose.  The dragon has so much dynamic range I was never in danger of clipping the skin tones.   I did this to help soften the skin.  As the lut compressed the highlights, it flattens out the brighter tones, in effect clarifying the variations in the models skin.   Plus since we were using a single source, it helped me get a bit extra light into the shadows to retain a bit of the information.

I find the RED Dragon sensor to behave much more like photochemical film than video.  Its much more “alexa” than MX chip.  Its dynamic range is way up top.  Especially with the new V2 OLPF.   Just like 35, the best way to get a thick negative is to open up a half stop or stop, then “print” down in development.  Or in the Dragon’s case, RCX.

The nearly 15 hours of footage boiled down to what you see. A :30 second spot.

——————————————————————————————————————————————————

3: “Come Play” – Sesame Street – Directed by Koyalee Chandra.

I have had the fortune to shoot a full on broadcast spot for Sesame Street.  It was for their new show in an after school time slot.

The main challenges on this shoot is that when working with the muppets, there are so many constraints to framing, camera height and special needs to the Muppeteers.   That said Koyalee our director envisioned a moving camera, and some “stunts”…..  This means special setups. My favorite thing in the world!!!  We built for the shots of grover a dual Dolley, that moved together, parallel so the Muppeteers can operate grover on one dolley, with their monitors and tools, while the camera was bolted to that dolley on a perfectly parallel track with speed rails, and the camera can maintain the appropriate frame.

We shot in Carroll Park in Brooklyn.   The day was sunny, and utilising the dynamic range of the Dragon ( I keep talking about it because its such an important and freeing aspect of the camera) all we needed was a bit of fill light bring up the character, without having to worry about a forest of flags and nets.  Outdoors in direct sun, a 4K par HMI with 1/4 CTO and some opal diffusion provided us with enough punch to lift the shadows against a back lit sun.   The highlight retention keeps the image looking natural, while saving us time and effort.   We planned the day so that as the sun moved across the sky, we shot the different pieces so all the scenes were back lit then filled in, maintaining a consistent look, despite a constantly changing sky.

IMG_2569 IMG_2568

 We shot with a custom look, based on REDLOGFILM that I built in RCX to give the post team a nice starting place from which to work.  A simple 709 look.

I enjoyed the technical challenge of making simple camera moves cater to the complexity of working with the Muppets.

—————————————————————————————————————————————————-

4: “TMNT Crossover Shoe” – FILA – Directed by the Diamond Brothers. Shot on RED Dragon V1 OLPF (for low light sensitivity) with Fujinon Cabrio and Duclos 11-16.

This was my first Shoe commercial.  Working again with the Diamond Bros, we had a very fun shoot, albeit short cause the final spot is only 15 seconds.  We needed the look and feel of Sodium vapor lamps, so we used a 9K Maxi Brute, placed relatively far from the set, at the same height as the actual street lights on the street we shot on.  This ensured the angle, and shadows would fall naturally, while giving us the output we needed to achieve the slow motion shots and wide shots equally well.  I skinned the Maxi in Urban Vapor 2, a somewhat green/yellow gel that matches Sodium vapor while maintaining a degree of color accuracy.  Roger Deakins used these gels on Tungsten lights for “In Time” to make the film feel like Los Angeles at night. It pays to read American Cinematographer, its full of great information.     For the Over head shots we rigged the camera to the Condor, and raised it up to the appropriate height with a “grip saver” offset.

Screen Shot 2014-08-26 at 5.01.09 PM

(Again, sorry for the lack of pictures of the setups, damn phone…..)

The Condor was then repurposed to a lighting platform after that shot was completed.  To prevent too many shadows from crossing the set at various intensities, we black wrapped the street lights selectively to build the ambient light level we wanted, and it really helped to balance the scene.

We also used the Low Angle Prism again, to get the camera appear to be nearly floor level for the dolly shots and shoe shots.

I love shooting night exteriors, sadly we had to buy stock footage of the city for the night aerials.   Budget didn’t allow for a chopper shoot….

 

—————————————————————————————————————————————————-

All in all it was a crazy few weeks, but I got to try so many new tools, techniques and lighting styles.

 

Thanks for Reading!

Follow me on Twitter and Instagram for more upto the minute film stuff.

Thanks for reading!

-Timur

Coming soon: A through assessment of the RED Dragon.

 

Work Log: Speed – My favorite setup for Run N Gun.

Sometimes the dreaded words on a phone call from a producer are “Run n Gun”.  Not that there is anything inherently wrong with the style, but it usually means your job as DP becomes making order from chaos.  It can be documentary, event coverage, or produced commercial “spontaneity”.   The last thing you need is your equipment getting in the way.  The K.I.S.S. principal comes into play, Keep It Simple Stupid.  I have been over the years building up a perfect speed setup for my needs.   It can be expanded to pretty much any camera in the medium to small size.   Epic, Scarlet, C300, BlackMagic or F3/5, but i usually use the Epic and here is why.

You need to address three simple factors.   Light control, Mobility and flexibility in imaging/delivery.   Meaning, each component of the trifecta must encompass a broad range of uses.

Screen Shot 2014-05-26 at 1.55.33 PM

Speed is a by product of light weight and small size.  90% of the time im using my RED epic with an Atomos Samurai Blade, with some light Canon zooms and a good quality tripod.  I use a Cartoni Focus HD head, with Carbon Fiber Induro legs.   Being able to move fast usually means no time for matte boxes or standard filters, so I go with variable ND from LightCraft. These are high quality variable ND with minimal green cast.   I really like these filters, as most daylight situations require a rather wide range of ND.  They provide 2-8stops of ND, and come in the two sizes most useful for Canon zooms,  77mm and 82mm.  This helps me significantly, I believe in holding one Fstop and ISO throughout a production to keep the feel of the image the same.   I can dial in the exposure in wild environments to precisely what i need, without touching the rest of the camera settings.

IMAG0491My Light Craft Variable ND in Action with a Black Magic Pocket Camera setup.  Director Randy Scott Slavin taking a look at a frame.

The epic gives me the flexibility of framerates, small size, and while i’m recording to Prores for a quick delivery, the RAW is still there for high framerate shots, and double backup on the footage.  I have 2x 230wHr Global Media Pro batteries and 2x 96wHr GMP batteries.  The 230’s are more than enough to power the RED and Atomos Recorder for 4 hours alone.  Between the four batteries, im getting almost 10-11 hours of constant runtime.  So in essence I carry,  4 batteries, 4 lenses: Tokina 11-16, Canon 16-35 L, Canon 24-105 IS L and canon 70-200 IS L.  They all fit neatly in a Tenba Roadie Backpack including the camera. (the Roadie is the most durable soft bag i’ve ever had, seriously its awesome).    I am covered from 11-200mm, not counting the additional push of dropping to 3K on the epic to extend the 200mm even further to approximately the FOV of a 280mm.  This is the essence of Run n’ Gun.   Be ready for anything.  That said, I am becoming a fan of the Black Magic Pocket Camera with the Metabones Speed booster.   Its really quite good for small shoots.  When using the Metabones Adapter, nearly S35 FOV, a 1/2 stop Light bonus, 13 stops dynamic range, and extraordinarily lightweight, almost to a fault. (You can see the setup I used for a corporate video above.)

The tripod is very important.   The reason I went with the Induro CF series is that not only are they strong, light and good quality, but they are NOT expensive. Especially considering the materials used.   From a business standpoint, building a lightweight setup is a black hole of cash flow.   It means repurchasing a lot of stuff in a smaller package.  A good used Cartoni head in decent shape is only about $250, and the Induro legs about $469.  Consider its competition: The miller CF legs, are over $1000 for something similar ( though understandably has more features).  Even the Manfrotto 504HD package, is about $717 from a very popular online retailer.   The name of the game is getting something reliable that will get the job done, and keeping costs down.  For me thats the Induro/Cartoni combo.  All the weight savings and fluid head performance at half the price.  It won’t go as tall as the Millers, but for 99% of my shooting its tall enough.  My studio tripod is an O’connor Fluid head with Ronford Baker two stage medium duty legs and spreader.  It weighs about 45lbs by itself with no camera.  Not practical for running around, nor was it cheap, so a lighter configuration means getting most of the performance of the heavy duty stuff, while keeping the business account intact.

IMAG0304

 

As you can see, a studio setup is not ideal for mobility.

There is no right or wrong.   I’m sure there are some folks who think I’m crazy shooting a run n’ gun with this configuration, but I find it rides the line between quality and speed perfectly for my work.  Hey, if I need to go faster, there is always the Black Magic Pocket Camera.

Thank you for reading,

until next time!

-T

Follow me on Twitter @TimurCivan for the latest!

 Up next…. A review of the RED Dragon.  ( as soon as it gets shipped back to me from RED) This one i’m excited about!

 

 

 

Cinematography as Art and the Complexity of Less

Welcome back to Tstops!

As many of you may or may not know, I used to be a fine artist.  A sculptor to be exact.  Before I started in the field of the moving image, I made sculptures and drawings, then sold them in galleries.   I was in love with making the work.  Every material I came across, man made or natural was a language in form, shape, color, composition and space.  This all started pretty early, around age 13, I picked up a pen, and just started creating images.  I always saw pictures, I think visually, almost to a fault.  If I can’t see something, I will imagine it until it makes sense to me.   This has always been the case, in elementary school, getting failing grades in math, only to receive perfect scores in geometry sections.  I can see the geometry, and its components and mechanisms make sense to me as clear as day.  I couldn’t understand why other students had trouble in geometry, while they excelled at arithmetic.   I had to adapt, I imagined the numbers in my head as shapes and units, and did my division and multiplication there.  What I didn’t realise, is that I had been conditioning my self, since early childhood to see things in a different way.   I thought I was odd, my teachers felt I had trouble focusing or that I was day dreaming.  No.  I was converting the world to pictures so I could understand it in terms that made sense to me.  My history classes were detailed movies in my head, with the actions and dialogue playing out in realtime.   My science classes (which I loved and excelled at) consisted of visualising cells, organ functions, chemistry reacting and physics playing out in my head space.   I had been secretly training to be an artist, cinematographer my whole life without knowing it.   Looking at the world differently, and seeing not what is there, but what could be there.  What’s funny is, while I was picturing these things, I automatically made them as beautiful as I could.  This just happened by default.

This in essence is what cinematography is.  You read a script and make an image come to life.  However, unlike a director, who makes the action happen, the DP gets the fun job of creating the feeling and mood around the actions.  This is a very intangible and difficult terrain to negotiate.  This is the return of the concept of “what could be there”.   There is no right or wrong way of achieving an image, but art is all about intention and invention.  When I attended NYU, for Studio Art ( I did not go to film school), the one thing that was drilled into us was that everything matters.  Every color, every line, every shape and every brush stroke. (Big thank you to my teacher Jesse Bransford! for kicking my butt about this)  The reason being, you know, as the creator, that the tiny imperfection is meaningless to the core idea of the piece.  In a weird way, after staring at a canvas or sculpture long enough you actually become blind to those things.  Your eyes adjust and write off the tiny imperfections.  The viewer will not.  With contemporary art, every square millimeter counts.   This is how I try my hardest to approach cinematography.   With the unforgiving eye of a viewer.   This makes the job a lot harder.  You have to balance speed, coverage, and quality against your own standards.  I feel this is the only path to take.  “Measure twice, cut once” as my father used to say.  This forces you to make decisions.   Decisions are important.   Decision, on set, is another word for some kind of limitation.   Limits are where great art is created.  It breeds creativity and wit.   I wondered, why some super famous directors work seemed to suffer over the years.  Their first 10 films being amazing, with their last 5 being mediocre.   I think the problem is that having the great success and the budgets and resources that go along with it, they no longer have any limits as compared to their beginnings.  They can create exactly what they (think they) want; even force it to happen digitally with VFX.  This lack of pause, and re-examination of the scene is detrimental.   This applies to any art.  More often than not, cutting the complex shot short, leads to a more elegant solution.  This forces you to examine what’s really happening with the story.  Think about it.  If you told a story to a friend, and described everything in detail, the story would come across as flat or unfunny.   Its the WAY you tell the story, the parts you leave out, the parts you embellish, that add the humor and engaging qualities.   Its the decisions you make on the fly and the punchlines you build that get the point across in an entertaining way.

This is why I like limits when making decisions.  I was never a fan of the post heavy cinematography that has fallen into vogue as of late.  Not because there is anything wrong with post color, stabilization, or reframing, but because it removes the human element from the story.   Its like going back half way through a joke and retelling a part because you didn’t tell it right the first time.  Subconsciously it comes across as forced.  Shooting for the look you want means crafting an image from scratch and trusting in your images.  Take a moment, get the joke right and don’t be afraid to be funny the first time!

In cinema, telling a story with a camera is a balancing act of beauty, utility and thrift.   The beauty is obvious.  Utility means actually getting functioning parts to tell the story… but then there is “thrift”.  This is the part that comes from you.  How do you accomplish a shot? How can you maximise what’s happening on the precious real estate of the screen to give the audience the maximum amount of information without being obvious.  Cinema is not a stage play.  You have the luxury of guiding the audiences focus to elements that have the most impact.  Yet, as an artist, you can also create elements that emphasize what the scene is about.  The amazing Roger Deakins is the master of this. This one scene from No Country for Old Men, in my opinion the finest cinematography of the last decade, illustrates the balance between, setting mood, creating elements and creating metaphor.  Please watch this clip.

What deakins did here is the script calls for the antagonist, Anton Chigur, to be hiding in the hotel room.  However when he enters, like a ghost the room is empty.  Chigur WAS in the room…  after all, they both stare at the empty deadbolt slot in the door, and they both saw each others reflections…   How did deakins create the feeling that Chigur is like a ghost, without being obvious.  His elegant solution is that when the door finally opens, Tommy Lee Jones’ character casts two distinct shadows on the wall.  There ARE two men in the room… its just that one of them is a shadow.  This kind of layered meaning, is what I mean by thrift.  There is so much information conveyed by this sequence of shots, thats not only gorgeous, but cuts like butter and without dialogue, but still tells the story.  That is the mark of an artist.

Less is more. This is specifically what I mean by intention, limits, and decision making.  The scene could have gone many different ways…  There could have been shots showing Chigur, actually hiding in a different room searching for the drug money and escaping with Tommy lee Jones’ character in the background.  That would have served the story as well… But it would have been obvious, and reduced the mystery of who Chigur is.   The decision to light and shoot the scene in this way is pure genius.  It develops character and moves the story along without the need to be cluttered or complex.  I cannot think of how it could have been done better.

In conclusion, I strive to make the shot speak as much as the actors.  Its not easy, but the artist in me won’t let it be any other way.

Thank you for reading.

-Timur

Follow me on Twitter: @timurcivan

 

 

 

 

Work Log: When Commercials get longer than :30….

Last year I teamed up with Chapter Media and Director Corydon Wagner to shoot a piece for Emblem Health, a health insurance company.  This was unlike most actual on air commercials as it tailored to a specific audience, mainly hospital administrators and care providers.   This means it was really more of an industrial or Corporate video, but specifically with the quality of a commercial.   How do you make 5 minutes look that good? Lots of work, a ton of planning and using the deep well of knowledge AKA the bag of tricks. This was a fun shoot because we shot so many different styles in one piece, slick clean commercial aesthetic, dramatic narrative style, and even a bit if clinical gritty hospital drama look.

Here is a bit of BTS from the 3 day shoot, with the final piece below that.

And the Final piece:

This felt way more like a short film than a commercial or industrial.   We had to work in a narrative manner to make sure we kept up the quality and speed.  Normally on a :30 second spot, you have 2 days to make every moment perfect, for only a few seconds of final material.   In this case we have to maintain perfection or as close to it as possible for the duration of the whole 5 minute video.

 

We shot on RED epic with Cooke Minis4 lenses, and I had a 5 ton G/E package.  Biggest light was a 6K HMI Par, but we didn’t pull that out. ( that said i was happy it was on standby, cause if we needed it, it would have been a life saver)

Here is a brief breakdown of some of my favorite scenes and the lighting:

Screen Shot 2014-02-17 at 2.04.34 PM

Screen Shot 2014-02-17 at 3.25.53 PM Screen Shot 2014-02-17 at 3.27.08 PM Screen Shot 2014-02-17 at 3.27.24 PM

This long dolly shot was initially supposed to play out as a 1 take wonder, starting in the wide and having the nurse wipe the frame and move into the two shot closeup.   My Key Grip Tank Rivara had me on a Matthews Dolley in free wheel mode, simply because the move was so long, and curved eventually.  The floors of the hospital are so smooth, that track was for the most part unnecessary.    In the final edit it was cut up for the sake of time, but it was a luxury to be able to go 360 on a wheeled dolley with no bumps.

The light setup was a follows:

photo (6)

I had an overhead rig built with two kinos pointing straight down, both bagged in silk together to diffuse the light even further.  This acted as the main “light” in the room. Mimicing the natural feel of a hospital room, while controlling the color and feel.  Initially the client wanted the room to feel greenish and authentic as seen in the BTS video, but this decision was changed later on.  Luckily the greenish tint in the RAW footage, was just metadata, and was easily removed in Resolve.  The First subject, the Man, seated on the bed, was mostly lit by the top light, with an eye light special, just for him hung over the door of the entrance to the room.  The “wife” was lit by the top light as well, but as she was behind it, I added a slight frame left key, to help bring up her eyes and act as a beauty fill.

 

The Next Setup, My favorite, was the breakfast scene:

Screen Shot 2014-02-17 at 2.05.41 PM

Screen Shot 2014-02-17 at 3.18.55 PM

Screen Shot 2014-02-17 at 3.19.14 PM

Screen Shot 2014-02-17 at 3.18.22 PM

 

This is pretty straight forward but utilized some of my favorite tools, the 4K HMI and Muslin 6X6 Rags.

I had a single wide beam 4K blasting in through the window, providing a near silhouette of the subject, however I took 2 6×6 muslin rags and had them arranged in  a V,  just outside the frame to catch the harsh light and provide a soft ambient fill.    The setup was simple, and with some simple camera movement, and a couple lens changes, we got a great look.

Here is the Diagram:

photo (7)

I hope you enjoyed this.

Till next time…..

-Timur

Follow me on Twitter for updates on Cinematography and great gear: @timurcivan

An Examination of: The RED DRAGON – Initial impressions

I don’t think there is a product out there in the digital cinema world that is quite as controversial as the Dragon sensor upgrade from RED.  In this brief review i’m going to go over the actual experience I had using the new sensor.  I do own an epic, no im not paid by RED.  Lets make that clear.  I will be doing a proper full test soon of the Dragon, but for now I want to talk about how it is to actually use.

 

photo (6)

 

I DPed a music video, on Dave Kruta’s anamorphic lomos, with the  Diamond Bros dragon upgraded Epic-M.  Truth is, the camera is actually pretty impressive.  The funny thing is, when I first fired up the camera, I noted: it looks great, nice dynamic range, at ISO 2000 the recommended native ISO, it was performing very well. Beautiful highlight rendition, crisp and clean blacks, tons of tonality.   But it didn’t make me say, “OH MY GOD!!!!!”  The day progressed nicely, and for an insert shot I had my Epic M- MX on stand by with a EF mount and a macro lens for the extreme close up work.  Thats when i realised the difference.   I thought my MX was broken….  It just looked …. old.  Its a funny thing with technology, you don’t notice an improvement  as being that huge until you take a step backwards in generation.  I love the current MX, but I just met its successful, smarter, hotter, younger sister.  The difference was significant and purely in image.   The image QUALITY is there….  The creaminess of the Alexa with the grainlessness of the Sony F series.  The color rendition has improved significantly, but the current dragon is still running RedColor3.  I wont make a judgment till its on RC4.   Even Tom Wong IATSE 600 DIT, the pickiest of the pickiest perfection obsessed image technicians you will ever run into on set said (and i quote) “It looks pretty good man…”.  (Thats a Rave review  from him by the way.)  The biggest improvements are in the lower mid tones, and the highlights.   The muddiness is gone.   You can shoot dark and still get rich subtle color on skin tones.  This has to do with the biggest spec upgrades in my opinion, the true 16bit files and new far more efficient REDCODE compression.   If RED should get accolades for anything on this update its the new compression. You just don’t see artifacts.  Compression wise 12:1 looks like 5:1,  and 17:1 looks like 10:1 .  Not that you should shoot that way, but it means that the lower compression schemes, like 3:1, 4:1 and 5:1 will behave like uncompressed.   Thats a good thing.

I had no way of measuring on set its actual dynamic range, but it is quite impressive, and like an F65, you can’t see all of it at once, even in RedLogFilm. There is just so much in the file.  This is a huge positive, because not only did its dynamic range kick the hell out of the MX, but it did it at ISO250.  The former “no no” of MX land is now a full and complete working stop.   It still has 13+ stops dynamic range at this “low” ISO.  On the MX, shooting at ISO 250 ment almost no highlight retention, something like 9 stops range below mid grey, and 3 above. On Dragon, it just looks great. You have to work hard to clip this chip.     This means working with bigger lights, with less ND is possible.   Folks forget that “film look” is mostly big lighting units.   Its hard to use big lights on a MX because it needs to sit at ISO 800 to have an even split on the dynamic range, this means lots of ND, which leads to all kinds of color shifts, IR contamination and things like that. IR cut filters make the image green, and muck up the balance.   Much better to shoot with a natively lower ISO.  This is the case with the F65/55 as well. Its spotless at ISO 2000,  but it looks awesome when dropped down low.   Really the only camera I can compare the dragon to is the F65.  The Alexa is in the ball park, but the resolution is a factor here too.   This is what gives it it’s absolutely spotless feel.   The down sampling cleans up the grain.   This is the same with the F65, its an “8K” chip that records 4K.   The Dragon should be used as a 6K capture, 4K delivery camera.   Should you choose to down sample to 1080, be prepared for a completely spotless image up to about ISO2000.  @ISO 250, its spotlessness is only comparable to the Sony F3 at -6dB.  Yea… that clean; if you don’t know what that looks like, if the subject isn’t moving it mind as well be a still image.

 

Over all, initial impression is that its stunning. But that “Oh My God!!” factor creeps up on you, it isn’t immediately noticeable until you start realising that you are not using any net to cut highlights, or don’t need to add fill to see in the shadows…  it just looks beautiful.

 

Thats it for now, i will do a thorough write up when the music video is out, with workflow, lighting and a more detailed experience with the camera.

 

Thanks for Reading.

Follow me on Twitter for all the latest updates to my blog: @timurcivan